Agents, landowners killing more wolves

Our colleague in Idaho, Ralph Maughan, reported brought the following story to our attention in his blog today:

Wolves challenging bison.  Courtesy NPS, 2004.

Wolves caught eating what they shouldn’t are paying a higher price these days.

A record number have been killed this year in the northern Rocky Mountains for going after cows, sheep, dogs and other domestic animals.

So far, 152 wolves have been shot by government agents or private landowners, about 50 more than last year and an eightfold increase from five years ago.

In Wyoming, one-quarter of all wolves living outside Yellowstone’s protective boundary were killed after reports of attacks on livestock.

Wolf managers are taking a more aggressive tack with problem wolves mostly because the population in Montana, Wyoming and Idaho has soared beyond expectation in recent years.

“We’ve got a recovered population so we’re pretty hard on them if they get into trouble,” said Ed Bangs, wolf recovery coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

There are at least 1,264 wolves in the three states, according to new figures provided Monday.

That’s roughly a 20 percent increase over 2005, which is on top of years of steady growth since wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995 and 1996.

To read the complete article from the Billings Gazette, click here.

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4 responses to “Agents, landowners killing more wolves

  1. Laird- I apologize, however I believe you miss read. As to the second part of my responce, I was making a general statement regarding the perception of the general population and the above article regarding livestock, wolf management, and the sterilization of our wild places. My comment was with regard to the article and my opinions based upon general perception and need for animal control. I of course do not know you and your background~ that was not the point of my response. I will state that nearly 5,000 wolves (Grey, Mexican, and Red) should not constitute as the full recovery of these animals let alone led to management.

    As for my statement ….You call “at least 1,264 wolves in the three states”, a reason “to delist the wolf so they can be managed as any other game animal while maintaining the minimum needed to sustain the population”. I am still confused as to the scientific data that would deam this the number of success.

    Have a great holiday!

  2. Antonio Jose Morales

    Shame on them!

  3. You call “at least 1,264 wolves in the three states”, a reason “to delist the wolf so they can be managed as any other game animal while maintaining the minimum needed to sustain the population”. I am amased!

    Why should livestock have more right to life than a native species? Why do you think you have the right to control what animal lives or dies in the wild? Is the mentality, “we killed the wolf, so why bring them back?” And, since they have been brought back, then you should be allowed to kill them again? Answer this: Which came first, the wolf, or the westerner/rancher/human/soccer mom,etc.? If humans choose to live in wild places then logic dictates that one must co-exist or move. I am tired of this human verses the rest of the animal kingdom debate. Who died and made us God?

    As to the belief, “the wolf is a vicious killer and needs to be radicallty controlled,” please!

    Apparently, you are detached from your own food…I’m certain you buy prepackaged meat. Go hunt something and then reassess this “vicious killer”.

  4. Yes! It is time to delist the wolf so they can be managed as any other game animal while maintaining the minimum needed to sustain the population from being wiped out from the western states like they were in the early 1900s.