Colorado Lynx on the Upswing

This is an undated photograph taken in May 2009 at an undisclosed located and supplied by the Colorado Division of Wildlife that shows a lynx kitten, which is one of 10 born this spring in Colorado, according to researchers. The discovery of the kittens after finding none the last two years and the location of some of the newborns outside what is considered the cats core area have buoyed the hopes of biologists overseeing the restoration of the long-haired mountain feline to the Centennial State. (AP Photo/Colorado Division of Wildlife) (AP)

This is an undated photograph taken in May 2009 at an undisclosed located and supplied by the Colorado Division of Wildlife that shows a lynx kitten, which is one of 10 born this spring in Colorado, according to researchers. The discovery of the kittens after finding none the last two years and the location of some of the newborns outside what is considered the cats' core area have buoyed the hopes of biologists overseeing the restoration of the long-haired mountain feline to the Centennial State. (AP Photo/Colorado Division of Wildlife) (AP)

Despite the federal government’s best efforts to downplay the resiliency of the rekindled lynx population in the Southern Rockies, this year we’ve seen an uptick in the number of wild-borne kittens.  Now, we need the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to own their legal responsibility to protect the habitat of these secretive cats.

Click here for the related Associated Press story.

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